Viewing folder permissions with vScope

File share permissions can be viewed with the help of vScope. Start working your way from a resource and outwards, and soon enough you will end up with a list of users with access.

Open up New Table -> File System Shares. A quick and usable insight is to identify the shares that have permissions set to “Everyone”. You will find that information under the tag “Access Rights Everyone”.

 

A file system share has it’s own property page. You can find it by looking up the name of the share using OmniSearch, or by right clicking it directly from Table Explorer and choosing “Open in properties”.

 

The property page will reveal a list of access groups, and their permission levels. Please observe that this is a top level view of your folder structure. Those permissions will most likely be varying as you navigate downwards on your shares.

Should you want to investigate permissions for a folder far down in a structure not scanned by vScope, then have a look at the settings directly on the folder. The groups shown in the permissions listing there can be found in vScope. A property page for a group will look something like this:

 

From this view, you can see both users and groups that are members of the group at hand. The view is clickable, so you can navigate on wards through member groups and obtain an overview of the nesting. Also, pay some attention to the Timeline, found on the lower right of the property page. Timeline gives you history for things like changes to group membership.

Additionally, you can improve your insights into access by opening up a group (resource type User Groups) from Table Explorer and building a view of nesting and membership. Turn on the tags/columns Users Count (number of users that are direct members), Users (list of users that are direct members), Member Groups Count (number of groups that are direct members), Member Groups (list of groups that are direct members), Groups Count (number of groups the group at hand is a member of) and Groups (list of groups that the group at hand is a member of).

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